21 Nov

TOP 5 COSTLY FINANCIAL MISTAKES HOMEOWNERS MAKE WITH THEIR MORTGAGE

General

Posted by: Angela Vidakovic

1. Not consolidating high interest debt into low interest mortgage.
2. Paying “fees” to get the lower rate
3. Not looking at their long term forecast
4. Taking a 5 year rate when 3-4 years can be cheaper
5. Having their mortgage with a lender that has high penalties and restrictive clauses.

Not consolidating high interest credit or vehicle loans in their mortgage. I hear this often “I don’t want to use the equity in my home” or “I can pay it off”. Many times when people end up with debts is due to inefficient budgeting and understanding what your income is and your debt payments are. There are many folks where monthly payment is the driving factor in their monthly budget. Making minimum payments can take you YEARS to pay off. Soon after people get mortgages, they are buying that new car at 0% interest and $600 month payments, then the roof or hot water tank goes and they put another $15,000 on credit, then someone gets laid off and boom…can’t make all the payments on all those debts that it took a 2 income family to make. It’s a true reality. Let’s look at an example:

Paying Fees to get the lower rate.
Dear rate chasers…they catch up with you somewhere. Nothing comes for free. Let’s face it, you go to the bank and their goal is to make money! A lender that offers you a 4.49% with a $2500 vs a 4.64% with no fee and you think “yes, score what a great rate!” Hold your coins… as you could be walking away poorer as the banker didn’t run the bottom line numbers for you. Chasing rates can cost you more money in the long run.

Your $500,000 mortgage was offered with two rates for the business for self guy who needed a mortgage where they didn’t look at the income so much: 4.49% and $2500 fee and $4.64% no fee. Lets see what it really looks like for a 2 year mortgage.

$502,500 (built in th $2500 feel) 4.49% – payments $2778 per month – $479563 owing in 2 years
Total payments: $66672
$500,000 (no fee) 4.64% – payments $2806 per month – $477634 owing in 2 years
Total payments: $67344.

Wait? So by taking the lower rate with the fee means I owe $1929 MORE in 2 years and only saved $672 in overall payments?

The long term financial planning side.
I counsel many of my clients to take 2-3 year year terms for a variety of reasons. Better rates, lower payments, capitalizing on the equity in your home to pay off a car loan or upcoming wedding. Did you know the average homeowner refinances every 3 years of a 5 year term and pays a penalty?

Taking a 5 year when 3 and 4 year rates might be a better option. Many times the 2-4 year rates can be significantly lower than the 5 year rates. Remember, the bank wants money and the longer you take the term, the more they make. True, many folks prefer or fit the 5 year terms, but many don’t. Worrying about where rates will be in 3-5 years from now should be a question, but not always the guiding factor in you “today” budget.
Here is an example of a $450,000 mortgage and what the difference in what you will owe on a 3 year term.

2.34% – payments are $990 every two weeks = $402,578 owing in 3 years
2.59% – payments are $1018 ever two weeks = $403,604 owing in 3 years.
Your paying $28 MORE every two weeks ($2184 total) and owe $1026 MORE in 3 years. Total LOSS $3210! Planning is key. Stop giving away your hard earned money!

Mortgage monster is in the penalties you pay when you fail to plan.
Since many families today are getting in with 5-10% as their downpayment.
If you got your mortgage with many of the traditional banks you know and your current mortgage is $403,750 and you need to break your mortgage (ie refinance to pay off debts) 3 years into the contract you potential penalty could be $12,672! Ouch. vs going with a mortgage broker who can put you with a lender that has similar rate you penalty would be significantly different – almost $10,000 dollars different!

Get a plan today! If you have any questions, please contact your local Dominion Lending Centres mortgage specialist.

20 Nov

MORTGAGE PAYMENT OPTIONS… WHICH IS THE BEST OPTION FOR YOUR SITUATION?

General

Posted by: Angela Vidakovic

Once your mortgage has been funded by your lender, you need to decide on how frequently you want to make your mortgage payments.

Most people want to pay off their mortgage as quick as possible to save paying interest.

We’ll discuss various mortgage payment options and then do the math by crunching mortgage numbers, keeping in mind: the longer it takes to pay off your mortgage, the more interest you pay.

Monthly: Most people’s typical payment option. Monthly payments will have the lowest payments therefore your mortgage will be paid off the slowest. For many people this is the most comfortable option, since it’s only one payment a month to plan for.
Bi-Weekly: Take your monthly mortgage payment multiply by 12 for a year, then divide by 26.
• You will make a mortgage payment every 2 weeks for a total of 26 payments per year.
• This will not help to pay your mortgage off any sooner than regular monthly payments.
Semi-Monthly: You make payments twice a month for a total of 24 payments a year.
• This will not help to pay your mortgage off any sooner than regular monthly payments.
Weekly: Take your monthly payments, multiply by 12 for a year, then divide by 52 weeks.
• This will not pay down your mortgage any sooner than regular monthly payments.
Accelerated Bi-weekly: Your monthly payment divided by 2.
• This option creates 2 extra bi-weekly payments a year, meaning you would be making 13 monthly payments a year (instead of 12). The two extra payments go directly to paying down the principal on your mortgage.
Accelerated Weekly: Your monthly payment divided by 4.
• This option creates 4 extra weekly payments a year, meaning you would be making 13 monthly payments over a year (instead of 12). The 4 extra payments go directly to paying down the principal on your mortgage.

I’ve crunched mortgage numbers by putting together a table using:
• $250,000 mortgage
• Mortgage rate 2.99%
• 5-year term
• Compounded semi-annually
• 25-year amortization
You can see how choosing the accelerated option pays your balance down a lot faster than regular payments.

Mortgages are complicated… Don’t try to sort all this out on your own. Call a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage specialist and let’s figure out what your best mortgage option will be!

15 Nov

UNDERSTANDING HOW BRIDGE FINANCING WORKS

General

Posted by: Angela Vidakovic

Sometimes in life, things don’t always go as planned. This could not be truer than in the world of Real Estate. For instance, let’s say that you have just sold your home and purchased a new home. The thought was to use the proceeds of the sale of your house as the down payment for the new purchase. However, your new purchase closes on June 30th and the sale of your existing house doesn’t close until July 15th—Uh-Oh! This is where Bridge Financing can be used to ‘bridge the gap’.

Bridge Financing is a short-term financing on the down payment that assists purchases to ‘bridge’ the gap between an old mortgage and a new mortgage. It helps to get you out of a sticky situation like the one above and has a few minimal fees associated with it.

The cost of a Bridge Loan is comprised of two parts. The first is the interest rate that you will be charged on the amount of funds that you are borrowing. This will be based on the Prime Rate and will vary from lender to lender. As a rule, you can expect to pay Prime plus 2.5%. The second cost to consider is an administration fee. Again, this will vary depending on the lender and can range from $200-$695.

The amount that you are able to borrow is easily calculated. The calculation looks like this:

Sale price
(less) estimated closing costs of 7%
(less) new mortgage of the purchase property

=Bridge Financing.

*Note: the closing costs included the expense of realtor commissions, property transfer tax, title insurance, legal fees and appraisal costs if applicable*

So that’s the cost side of things, now the next question is: how long? The length of time that you can have Bridge Financing is going to vary again from lender to lender as well as with what province you are in. For most, it is in the range of 30-90 days but there are some lenders that will go up to 120 days in certain cases.

Before applying for Bridge Financing, you must also have certain documents at the ready to present. These documents include the following:

1. A firm contract of purchase and sale with a copy of the signed and dated subject removal on the property that you are selling and the property that you are purchasing.
2. An MLS listing of the property being sold and purchased.
3. A copy of your current mortgage statement.
4. All other lender requested docs to satisfy the new mortgage of the upcoming purchase.

Once you have those documents, you can work with a qualified mortgage broker to apply for bridge financing. It is an important tool to understand and a great one to have in your back pocket for when life throws you one of those ‘curve balls’. You can have peace of mind knowing that if/when that situation arises, you are not without a strong option that can provide you with interim financing for minimal cost.

As always, if you have any questions about Bridge Financing, or any questions about your mortgage (be it new or old) contact a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage broker. We are well-versed in all things mortgage related and can help come up with creative, cost effective solutions for you.

written by: Geoff Lee